The Binding of Issac: Four Souls Card Game Launches on Kickstarter


The Binding of Isaac creator Edmund McMillen has launched a Kickstarter campaign for a card game called The Binding of Isaac: Four Souls

Four Souls is a bit of passion project for McMillen. He informed IGN that he was initially approached by an outside company who wanted to make a card game based on The Binding of Issac. However, McMillen wasn’t interested in letting someone else develop that concept.

“If I ever did something like that it would have to be something that I made,” said McMillen. “I would have to be into the design and I’d want full control over it.”

About a year after he was approached with that idea, McMillen began working on a Binding of Issac card game of his own design. Based on the information included in the Kickstarter campaign, Four Souls isn’t quite like any other card game on the market. It sees players taking turns to collect items and beat bosses in order to gather four important souls. Along the way, players will be able to expand their decks and barter, trade, and buy better items. 

While the core gameplay described in the demonstration video makes it sound like Four Souls is trying to replicate the roguelike experience of The Binding of Issac, it doesn’t seem like Four Souls is going to impose the permadeath system featured in that genre. Death is present in Four Souls, but dying doesn’t necessarily mean that you lose everything. 

It seems that McMillen’s main goal is to ensure that every aspect of Four Souls – from the gameplay to the art – captures the spirit of The Binding of Issac. The result is a fascinating concept for a card game that captures the adventurous spirit of titles like Slay the Spire but doesn’t draw any immediate comparisons in terms of its similarities with other card games.

The Binding of Issac: Four Souls has already surpassed its $50,000 pledge goal (it’s currently at over $500,000) and still has 28 days left to go. 

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