Garbage Pail Kids Mobile Card Game Coming in 2018


Developer Jago Studios is contributing to the eternal quest to reboot absolutely everything from the ’80s by creating a mobile game based on the Garbage Pail Kids

Continuing the recent trend of upcoming games we don’t currently know much about, there sadly aren’t many details available about the upcoming Garbage Pail Kids game out there at this time. What we can tell you is that this free to play mobile game will allow players to build a collection of Garbage Pail Kid cards and use them to win card-based duels. There’s no indication that this will be a PvP game, but that’s always a possibility. 

Stuart Drexler, JagofStudios Founder and Chief Executive Officer, briefly spoke about the upcoming game in a recent press release by calling the Garbage Pail Kids “icons of the ‘80s,” and stating that Jago Studios are “thrilled to be working with Topps and look forward to bringing these memorable characters to life in a new way fans can interact with, directly on their mobile devices.”

This untilted Garbage Pail Kids game is expected to release for iOS and Android sometime in 2018. 

If you missed the Garbage Pail Kids fad and are wondering what this is all about…well, thank you for reading a story about something you previously had no knowledge of so that you can expand your worldview even just a bit. You are truly the patron saint of the internet. 

Anyway, the Garbage Pail Kids were a parody of the Cabbage Patch Kids. Garbage Pail Kids trading cards featured grotesque, violent, and offensive character designs that kids everywhere couldn’t get enough of. The rest of the world was introduced to Garbage Pail Kids via the 1987 movie of the same name. That movie is generally considered to be one of the worst major motion pictures ever made. 

We eagerly await seeing if this upcoming mobile game can achieve a similar honor. 

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